Elsewhere for October 23, 2016

You should read this for 10/23/2016:

On the campaign trail in Ohio, President Obama blasts the GOP “The problem is, is that they’ve been riding this tiger for a long time, . . . They’ve been feeding their base all kinds of crazy for years, primarily for political expedience.”

Why We’re Living in the Age of Fear “Jen Senko believes that her father was brainwashed. As Senko, a New York filmmaker, tells it, her father was a ‘nonpolitical Democrat.’ But then he transferred to a new job that required a long commute and began listening to conservative radio host Bob Grant during the drive. Eventually, he was holing himself up for three hours every day in the family kitchen, mainlining Rush Limbaugh and, during commercials, Fox News.”

From Arizona Republic’s Mi-Ai Parrish via Medium.com How do we respond to threats after our endorsement? “We chose patriotism over party. We endorsed the Democrat. And then the reaction started pouring in. Threats against our business. Threats against our people.”

The United Federation of “hold my beer, I got this”

Medieval historian David M. Perry writing at CNN.com points out that This is not the Crusades: There’s nothing medieval about ISIS Perry notes: “As a medieval historian, I’ve been watching the ways in which Trump, other politicians, and even plenty of journalists characterize ISIS and its horrific actions as “medieval.” I’ve always thought it was a mistake, but a mistake mostly limited to the world of rhetoric. On Friday, that changed.”

The white flight of Derek Black“Derek Black, 27, was following in his father’s footsteps as a white nationalist leader until he began to question the movement’s ideology.”

Lemon Almond Bars from Southern Living.

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Elsewhere for October 16, 2016

You should read this for 10/16/2016:

Preparing for the Future of Artificial Intelligence From the Executive Office of the President National Science and Technology Council Committee on Technology; .pdf file.

The Thing All Women Do That You Don’t Know About

Via The Economist Barack Obama writes about the four crucial areas of unfinished business in economic policy that his successor will have to tackle There’s a succinct but historically accurate pocket history of America’s economy in the 20th and 21st centuries.

Via Southern Living: Braised Beans with Collard Greens and Ham Perfect for a fall Sunday.

America’s “Government” Cheese Glut

Via The Guardian Michelle Obama has dragged this US election out of the gutter

via PBS’s Nature Super Hummingbirds” streaming online until 11/12/2016.

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Elsewhere for October 9, 2016

You should read this for 10/9/2016:

How to make Armenian coffee from Henry Kalebjian Henry is the master roaster at San Francisco’s Henry’s House of Coffee

The Neighborhood Bookstore’s Unlikely Ally? The Internet“After years of losses, [independent bookstores] are emerging from the decimation, with the number of independent bookstores rising 21 percent from 2010 to 2015. In a twist of fate, it is the internet — the very thing that was supposed to wipe them out — that is helping these small stores.”

Washington Post: “Finally. Someone who thinks like me.”“Like millions of others, she believed that President Obama was a Muslim. And like so many she had gotten to know online through social media, she also believed that he was likely gay, that Michelle Obama could be a man, and that the Obama children were possibly kidnapped from a family now searching for them.”

The latest Pew research poll shows people think libraries have resources they need“The Pew survey found that libraries have become important community tech hubs in recent years, particularly for young, black, and low-income communities. The public institutions provide important access to computers, the internet, and public Wi-Fi networks, surveyors reported.”

Via Epicurious; A moist New Year’s Honey Cake La Shana Tova; happy New Year! Welcome in 5775 with a tasty tradition.

White House tribute to Ray CharlesAnd yes, there’s singing. Going to miss the Obamas; a great President and First Lady, who are also a loving couple and parents. They’ve made the world better.

Tsundoku: There’s a word in Japanese for Buying Books and Not Reading them

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Elsewhere for October 2, 2016

You should read this for 10/2/2016:

Via The New York Times: “Hillary Clinton for President: Our endorsement is rooted in respect for her intellect, experience and courage. . . . In any normal election year, we’d compare the two presidential candidates side by side on the issues. But this is not a normal election year. A comparison like that would be an empty exercise in a race where one candidate — our choice, Hillary Clinton — has a record of service and a raft of pragmatic ideas, and the other, Donald Trump, discloses nothing concrete about himself or his plans while promising the moon and offering the stars on layaway.”

A recent excavation of a Roman cemetery in London reveals more data about Roman Britian’s multi-cultural cosmopolitan nature. “Four people were ethnically African and two were Asian – potentially from ancient China, one of the most advance civilisations at the time. While it wasn’t unexpected to find such a diverse bunch of individuals, with different origins, who had been laid to rest at this burial site, the discovery that people from Asia were among them was a lot more out of the blue.” The full study by Rebecca C. Redferna, Darren R. Gröckec, Andrew R. Millardb, Victoria Ridgewayd, Lucie Johnsonb, Joseph T. Hefnere, is in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Volume 74, October 2016, Pages 11–22.

John Oliver on Trump, Clinton and Raisins

New and rare forms of sea life discovered in Hawaii’s depths Two submersibles exploring undersea mountains reveal a wealth of perfectly adapted lifeforms.

Trek Against TrumpIn an unapologetically frank open letter, published to a Facebook page called Trek Against Trump, “Star Trek” actors, directors, producers, and crew members expressed their political stance that Donald Trump represents the opposite of everything “Star Trek” stands for and should not be allowed anywhere near the presidency.

In the heartland of the American right, people harmed by polluting industries have instead come to hate the government whose environmental regulations protect them. Now they’re voting for Donald Trump.

Fall has arrived, bringing an abundance of apples and pears, perfect for making Oatmeal Crisp.

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Elsewhere for September 25, 2016

You should read this for 9/25/2016:

The FBI Wants To Hire Young Tech Savants, Has No Idea How To Attract Them“If the FBI can’t find the hires it needs, it will continue to slide into tech irrelevance. But it created this downhill slope itself. It’s going to be impossible to attract new talent when the unspoken part of Comey’s pitch is that this talent will be used to punch holes in encryption and strip internet users of their anonymity.”

A Quadruple Take on the Giraffe: There are Four Species, Not One“Until this point the African mammals were classified on the species level as Giraffa camelopardalis, or simply the giraffe. Now they will belong to one of four species: the southern giraffe, the Masai giraffe, the reticulated giraffe and the northern giraffe.”

Until she ran for president, Clinton was the most admired woman in the world“The most qualified presidential candidate in history got twice the negative media as a racist four-time bankrupt con artist who is manifestly unfit for public office.”

Deep Dark Old Recipe Bran MuffinsNot the perfect bran muffin, but close. The Molasses is a great touch.

Elizabeth Warren grills Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf (via NPR): “”Here’s what really gets me about this, Mr. Stumpf. If one of your tellers took a handful of $20 bills out of the crash drawer, they’d probably be looking at criminal charges for theft. They could end up in prison. But you squeezed your employees to the breaking point so they would cheat customers and you could drive up the value of your stock and put hundreds of millions of dollars in your own pocket.”

Indigenous languages are turning to digital technology to preserve their past and adapt to an ever-changing world. The latest technology may just provide a way to help save some of the world’s most threatened languages. “As he counted the 10 tiny fingers and 10 tiny toes of his firstborn child, Hinson realized he had nothing to teach his son about his Native American roots. The only thing he had to pass on was his tribal citizenship card. Hinson wanted to bequeath more than just a piece of paper; he wanted his son to be apart of Chickasaw culture. He recognized that the most direct way to understand his culture was to speak the language. But to make that happen, Hinson had to start with himself.”

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Elsewhere for September 18, 2016

You should read this for 9/18/2016:

Renegade 911
Jim Wright is a retired US Navy Chief Warrant Officer and freelance writer. He wrote a deeply thoughtful, emotional and intelligent piece about 9/11. Facebook removed the post and strangers attempted to hack Wright’s FB account. Go read the piece.

India’s War On Biryani Mixes Caste, Religion, Cow-Avenging Vigilantes“The battle around food is not just about eating,” says social scientist Shiv Viswanathan, professor at Jindal Global Law School in Haryana. “Food is essentially the grammar of society. You show hospitality through food. You can also insult someone through food.”

A Greek Mom shows you how to make Greek coffee with a briki at homeOr you can watch Ted Lelekas make greek coffee here.

The Fortingall Yew standing in a church yard in Perthshire, Scotland is estimated to be 5,000 years old. And it seems to be changing sex.

According to a study published by Vyacheslav A. Ryabov (via Mashable) Dolphins engage in complex conversations in an advanced spoken language made up of pulses and whistles.

Bake your own Rustic Loaf. This Epicurious recipe for a single loaf of slow-rise bread is a great way to try making your own bread. It rises overnight, slowly, which makes it much less of an adventure in baking, and far more predictable for those new to bread-baking, or juggling work-family-home.

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Elsewhere for September 11, 2016

You should read this for 9/11/2016:

Today’s workplace design asks us to be permanently on call—and demands that we vanish at a moment’s notice.“This anywhering of the office renders our attempts to disappear by implementing out-of-the-office replies instantly moot and futile. Work will fill the space available to it. And with no space spared, it will find you wherever you are: not just your work office, but also your home, your yoga studio, your children’s kindergarten. And what is more, in addition to our physical selves we now have to manage this professional avatar as well. And due to the ongoing metrification and financialization of work we are increasingly stripped of the clutter that makes us us. All of our quirks and idiosyncratic features have no use, as they can either not be numbered or would just make us look messy and thus unproductive.”

Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness“Researchers have found mounting evidence linking loneliness to physical illness and to functional and cognitive decline. As a predictor of early death, loneliness eclipses obesity.”

Mars Rover Views Spectacular Layered Rock FormationsIncredible new pictures of Mars landscapes; you really need to see them. They’re both strikingly familiar and strikingly alien.

Turns Out Even Being an Actual NASA Astronaut Won’t Stop Random Men From Mansplaining Space to You. The mansplaining phenom is growing. I had a guy explain to me, as Medievalist on Twitter, that Chaucer didn’t really have poor spelling (a joke I made in concert with another medievalist posing as Chaucer), he wrote in Old English [sic]. It’s getting worse, not better. Whether it’s because of a rising sense of entitlement, or a decreasing level of reading comprehension, or both, I do not know. But it is annoying in the extreme.

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Elsewhere for September 4, 2016

You should read this for 9/4/2016:

Big History ProjectHistory study resource ready-for-the-classroom resource available to everyone, everywhere. For free

Rachel Maddow video on American History, nativism, and the original no-nothings.

Deep in the Swamps, Archaeologists Are Finding How Fugitive Slaves Kept Their Freedom“Marronage, the process of extricating oneself from slavery, took place all over Latin America and the Caribbean, in the slave islands of the Indian Ocean, in Angola and other parts of Africa. But until recently, the idea that maroons also existed in North America has been rejected by most historians.”

The Pill, the Condom, and the American Dream“The number of sexually active American teenagers using no contraception fell by 35 percent in just seven years. Meanwhile, the teen birth rate has fallen almost 50 percent since 1990. . . . Poor kids are finally narrowing the achievement gap with rich kids. Is contraception the cause? It might seem like a mystery at first, even a paradox: The income gap between rich and poor adults is growing, but the achievement gap between rich and poor kids is shrinking.”

In a hilarious series of comics, illustrator John Atkinson gives us some less-than-classic descriptions of the classic books you probably had to read in high school.In 1926, The New York Times described Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises/as “a truly gripping story, told in a lean, hard, athletic narrative prose that puts more literary English to shame.” Atkinson’s summary: “Lost generation gets drunk. They’re still lost.”

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Elsewhere for August 28, 2016

You should read this for 8/28/2016:

Harvey Mudd College took on gender bias and now more than half its computer-science majors are women

How Twitter Got Angry: “Twitter is suffering from a systemic harassment problem. This isn’t news—it’s been written about over and over again, and has become a trope in the cultural mainstream.”

Puffin chicks in Gulf of Maine’s largest colony starve to death at record rate”In a typical year, 60 percent of the puffin nests with eggs produce chicks that fly off in late summer to begin their life at sea. This year the number was only 12 percent – 320 chicks – the worst result since researchers began monitoring the colony in 1995.”

Ophelia Settle Egypt ‘s “Voices of Slavery”:‘They Were Saving Me For A Breeding Woman’

After Two Years, Lost NASA Spacecraft Phones HomeUsing the Deep Space Network, mission control has reestablished contact with the solar observatory STEREO-B

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Elsewhere for August 21 2016

You should read this for 8/21/2016:

Stark New Evidence on How Money Shapes America’s Elections New evidence showing that the more you spend, the more you get — and the more money and wealth shape policy.

How looting in Iraq unearthed the treasures of Gilgamesh Missing text for Gilgamesh recovered when an Assyriologist spots an unusual tablet in a collection of looted artifacts for sale.

Does technological analysis destroy the romance of art history? Increasingly the use of new technologies, like computer assisted digital analysis of texts, or spectroscopic examinations of painting uncovering alternate versions or older works on re-used canvas, is changing the way we look at familiar works of art.

NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments. The announcement notes that there were “clues that indicate those who comment are not wholly representative of the overall NPR audience: They overwhelmingly comment via the desktop (younger users tend to find NPR.org via mobile), and a Google estimate suggested that the commenters were 83 percent male, while overall NPR.org users were just 52 percent male.” See also Chris Cillizza’s comments in the Washington Post: NPR is killing off comments. That’s great news!

The Duo That Dominates Dressage Britain’s Charlotte Dujardin, an “outsider athlete” riding Valegro has revived the ancient equestrian sport of dressage. Here they are riding and scoring an unprecedented 93.857 in the Grand Prix 2016 Olympics freestyle in Rio.

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