Elsewhere for August 28, 2016

You should read this for 8/28/2016:

Harvey Mudd College took on gender bias and now more than half its computer-science majors are women

How Twitter Got Angry: “Twitter is suffering from a systemic harassment problem. This isn’t news—it’s been written about over and over again, and has become a trope in the cultural mainstream.”

Puffin chicks in Gulf of Maine’s largest colony starve to death at record rate”In a typical year, 60 percent of the puffin nests with eggs produce chicks that fly off in late summer to begin their life at sea. This year the number was only 12 percent – 320 chicks – the worst result since researchers began monitoring the colony in 1995.”

Ophelia Settle Egypt ‘s “Voices of Slavery”:‘They Were Saving Me For A Breeding Woman’

After Two Years, Lost NASA Spacecraft Phones HomeUsing the Deep Space Network, mission control has reestablished contact with the solar observatory STEREO-B

Elsewhere for August 21 2016

You should read this for 8/21/2016:

Stark New Evidence on How Money Shapes America’s Elections New evidence showing that the more you spend, the more you get — and the more money and wealth shape policy.

How looting in Iraq unearthed the treasures of Gilgamesh Missing text for Gilgamesh recovered when an Assyriologist spots an unusual tablet in a collection of looted artifacts for sale.

Does technological analysis destroy the romance of art history? Increasingly the use of new technologies, like computer assisted digital analysis of texts, or spectroscopic examinations of painting uncovering alternate versions or older works on re-used canvas, is changing the way we look at familiar works of art.

NPR Website To Get Rid Of Comments. The announcement notes that there were “clues that indicate those who comment are not wholly representative of the overall NPR audience: They overwhelmingly comment via the desktop (younger users tend to find NPR.org via mobile), and a Google estimate suggested that the commenters were 83 percent male, while overall NPR.org users were just 52 percent male.” See also Chris Cillizza’s comments in the Washington Post: NPR is killing off comments. That’s great news!

The Duo That Dominates Dressage Britain’s Charlotte Dujardin, an “outsider athlete” riding Valegro has revived the ancient equestrian sport of dressage. Here they are riding and scoring an unprecedented 93.857 in the Grand Prix 2016 Olympics freestyle in Rio.

Elsewhere for August 14, 2016

Barack Obama accuses Donald trump of founding The Village People

Autism, OCD and Attention Deficit May Share Brain Markers

Print your own high-quality topographic map from National Geographic (via Life Hacker)

Earliest population of America not through Bering Land Bridge In a research study published in Nature “researchers conclude that while people may well have travelled this corridor after about 12,600 years ago, it would have been impassable earlier than that . . . If this is true, then it means that the first Americans, who were present south of the ice sheets long before 12,600 years ago, must have made the journey south by another route. The study’s authors suggest that they probably migrated along the Pacific coast.”

Whale wars: Why Humpbacks save other species from Orca attacks Recent whale-watchers in British Columbia, CA witnessed Humpbacks fending off Orcas interested in a humpback calf.

Three Apple Engineers and Three Microsoft Engineers

Three Apple engineers and three Microsoft engineers are traveling by train to a conference. At the station, the three Microsoft engineers each buy tickets and watch as the three Apple engineers buy only a single ticket. “How are three people going to travel on only one ticket?” asks a Microsoft engineer. “Watch and you’ll see,” answers the Apple engineer.

They all board the train. The Microsoft engineers take their respective seats but all three Apple engineers cram into a rest room and close the door behind them. Shortly after the train has departed, the conductor comes around collecting tickets. He knocks on the rest room door and says, “Ticket, please.” The door opens just a crack and a single arm emerges with a ticket in hand. The conductor takes it and moves on. The Microsoft engineers saw this and agreed it was quite a clever idea. So after the conference, the Microsoft engineers decide to copy the Apple engineers (as they always do) on the return trip and save some money.

When they get to the station, they buy a single ticket for the return trip. To their astonishment, the Apple engineers don’t buy a ticket at all. “How are you going to travel without a ticket?” asks one perplexed Microsoft engineer. “Watch and you’ll see,” answers an Apple engineer. When they board the train the three Microsoft engineers cram into a restroom and the three Apple engineers cram into another one nearby. The train departs. Shortly afterward, one of the Apple engineers leaves his restroom and walks over to the restroom where the Microsoft employees are hiding. He knocks on the door and says, “Ticket, please . . .”

 

From here.

 

University of Texas on Fair Use and Copyright

We would all appreciate a clear, crisp answer to that one, but far from clear and crisp, fair use is better described as a shadowy territory whose boundaries are disputed, more so now that it includes cyberspace than ever before. In a way, it’s like a no-man’s land. Enter at your own risk.

More from here.

 

What it costs for a best-selling e-book: $12.99

Contrary to popular belief, the costs of creating an e-book and a hardcover edition are similar. About 10 percent of hardcover costs go to printing, binding and shipping. Publishers set a retail price for an e-book, and selling agents such as Amazon.com and Apple receive a flat percentage of that retail price. These estimates are based on sales of 75,000. Expenses for a book include one-time costs such as editing and marketing. Many e-books lose money for publishers; e-books that sell millions of copies offset losses from less popular books. – Andrew Schneider

 

COST TO PUBLISHER $9.09

Author royalties $2.27

Editing/digitizing 0.28

Marketing1.00

Overhead 3.18

Operating profit 2.36

COST TO RETAILER $3.90

Overhead .50

Digital rights management .10

Pre-tax operating profit 3.30

Price to consumer $12.99

 

Washington Post Saturday, February 5, 2011

From here.

 

Usability.gov

http://usability.gov/

Usability.gov is a one-stop source for government web designers to learn how to make websites more usable, useful, and accessible. The site addresses a broad range of factors that go into web design and development. The site will help you to:

* Plan and design usable sites by collecting data on what users need

* Develop prototypes

* Conduct usability tests and write up results

* Measure trends and demographics