Elsewhere for May 21, 2017

You should read this for 5/21/2017:

Via The New York Times: The World Is Getting Hacked. Why Don’t We Do More to Stop It?

Ransomware Attacks Ravage Computer Networks In Dozens Of Countries “So this attack is raising one of these fundamental issues that we talk about in the security world, about whether NSA surveillance protects people or creates unexpected damage that does more harm than good.”

Dutch king reveals double life as an airline pilot for KLM King Willem-Alexander has been ferrying passengers around for 21 years, but they are never told there’s a royal in the cockpit.

Noah Berlatsky Better Suggestions “A lot of well intentioned but confused folks think that political change happens through rational discourse and persuasion.”

Jaed Coffin via Down East Magazine: The Mystery of Maine Mystery Writers “We live in one of the least homicidal, most neighborly places in the country. Why has crime fiction become our de facto state literary genre?”

Alex Tizon in The Atlantic: My Family’s Slave “She lived with us for 56 years. She raised me and my siblings without pay. I was 11, a typical American kid, before I realized who she was.”

Corn on the Cob Cooked in Milk and Butter. This Southern corn-on-the-cob cooking method is incredible. Really.

 

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Elsewhere for May 14, 2017

You should read this for 5/14/2017:

Via the BBC: Obamacare v Republican plan compared

FCC and Congress Work to Roll Back Net Neutrality“he FCC, under a new chairman aligned with the Trump administration, is moving fast to undo the net neutrality framework that has been upheld by the courts. Furthermore, the Republican-controlled Congress is moving to strip the FCC of the authority it used to create that legal foundation in the first place, so in the future the FCC would not have the authority to “redo” the “undo.” And it’s all being done in the name of “restoring freedom.”

Sally Yates Testifies: “We Believed Gen. Flynn Was Compromised” “We believed that Gen. Flynn was compromised with respect to the Russians,” Yates told a Senate subcommittee on Monday. “To state the obvious, you don’t want your national security adviser compromised by the Russians.”

One Hearing, Two Different Realities — And The Data Prove It “Flynn was left in the job, with all of his clearances, for 18 days after Yates met with White House counsel Don McGahn. He was only let go after the information became public through news reports.”

Actual words my coworkers have said to me, a woman in tech Yes, it’s all true, and more and worse besides.

The great British Brexit robbery: how our democracy was hijacked “A shadowy global operation involving big data, billionaire friends of [#45] and the disparate forces of the Leave campaign influenced the result of the EU referendum. As Britain heads to the polls again, is our electoral process still fit for purpose?”

From King Arthur Flour: Chocolate Stout Cake with stout, cocoa, chocolate, and butter, with lots of butter, also sour cream and heavy cream . . . oh, and butter.

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Elsewhere for May 7, 2017

You should read this for 5/7/2017:

Via The New York Times: Gorsuch, in Sign of Independence, Is Out of Supreme Court’s Clerical Pool “The pool has been criticized for giving too much power to law clerks and for contributing to the court’s shrinking docket.”

Via Medium: Thousands of Veterans Want to Learn to Code — But Can’t

Via The New York Times Cooking: Homemade Pita Bread and a recipe for Tzatziki.

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Elsewhere for April 30, 2017

You should read this for 4/30/2017:

Via NPR: A Watergate Villain Walks Into A Berkeley Restaurant. What Could Go Wrong? One of the thing I love best about this food culture history piece is the Editor’s Note: “This post is about chefs and they can be quite coarse when they talk. Don’t be surprised by a little foul language.”

Via Slate: The Empty Waistband “As Sotomayor pointed out in her dissent, both of these rulings warp the law in an effort to reach a police-protective outcome.” See also The Supreme Court’s double standard for qualified immunity cases “But I found Alito’s description of the court’s neutral principles of certiorari a little hard to fully accept for several reasons.”

From the March for Science: A Brain Hat

University of California administration is paying excessive salaries and mishandling funds, state audit says “The auditor said that because of recent tuition hikes, she recommends the Office of the President should refund available funds in the reserves by returning them to the campuses for the benefit of students.” . . . “Auditors said salaries paid to those in the president’s office are much higher than the pay of comparable positions in other state government jobs.” Here’s the actual audit.

Via Medium: Stephen Levy interviews Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter. Twitter’s CEO on the president, the future of the product, and the harassment problem.

19th Century Princess And Cookbook Author Was Also Georgia’s First Feminist “Georgia is having something of a gastronomic renaissance, with restaurateurs improvising beyond staples like walnut paste-stuffed veggies and shashlik. The trend is largely toward fusion and innovation, but it is also about putting history on the menu.”

Go Ahead, Have That Fourth Cup of Coffee “A new scientific review on the safety of caffeine says drinking up to four cups of coffee, or about 400 milligrams of caffeine, is pretty safe.”

UNC Professor Andrew Reynolds Gorka: Is the #FakeTerrorismExpert’s Ph.D fake? “Gorka is a fraud — a charlatan of the most brazen hue — a snake-oil salesman whose supposed Ph.D dissertation would have never passed muster in America or Britain and to put the cherry on the cake was approved by a fraudulent panel of examiners.”

Calans Mai or May Day or Beltain

Tea brack “—a.k.a. Irish Freckle Bread — is a moist, close-grained, packed-with-fruit breakfast bread.” And yes, it’s made with strong brewed tea (and better if you also add a tiny bit of Irish).

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Elsewhere for April 23, 2017

You should read this for 4/23/2017:

Via Business Insider: Undercover in An iPhone Factory: What it’s really like to work in a Chinese mega-factory, according to a student who spent 6 weeks there

It’s time to start thinking about Cold Brew Coffee

Silicon Valley executives are hiring philosophers to teach them to question everything Maybe some day they’ll move upstream to rhetoric, and learn how to reason as well as how to talk about thinking.

There’s a new book about the Voynich ms. Here’s a review from Eamon Duffy via The New York Review of Books

Shakespeare was born today. He’s still pretty good.

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Elsewhere for April 16, 2017

You should read this for 4/16/2017:

Here’s the Fine Print On The Country’s Biggest-Ever Free College Plan “The bill is what’s known as a ‘last-dollar’ program.’ Translation: Students must first apply for, and use, other money like federal Pell Grants, before turning to the scholarship. That, in turn, means that low-income students have less to gain from the scholarship than do students from families who are too wealthy to qualify for those grants.”

Scott Rosenberg on How Google Book Search Got Lost “Google Books was the company’s first moonshot. But 15 years later, the project is stuck in low-Earth orbit.”

Pan Baked Lemon Almond Tart This is really a different take on a tart; almost a sweet frittata.

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Elsewhere for April 8, 2017

You should read this for 4/9/2017: Look Ma! A plagiarizer has the gavel, now even students can fact check your ass, and lunch shaming is shameful, but lunch is better with Kale. And potatoes. And Sausage. 

Gorsuch’s writings borrow from other authors “several passages from the tenth chapter of his 2006 book, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia, read nearly verbatim to a 1984 article in the Indiana Law Journal. In several other instances in that book and an academic article published in 2000, Gorsuch borrowed from the ideas, quotes and structures of scholarly and legal works without citing them.” Yep. That’s plagiarism. That’s not borrowing; it’s theft, and it is not ok, acceptable or “normal.”

Via NPR: Kansas Student Newspaper’s Fact Check Results In New Principal’s Resignation

Via The New York Times: New Mexico Outlaws School ‘Lunch Shaming’
“What is ‘lunch shaming?’ It happens when a child can’t pay a school lunch bill.”

Kale, Potatoes, and Sausage Soup Some soups work for Winter and Spring; this is one of them.

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Elsewhere for April 2, 2017

You should read this for 4/2/2017:

Indivisible: Stories of American Community Indivisible: Stories of American Community is an exploration of community life in America by some of this country’s most accomplished photographers, radio producers, and folklorists. Here are the stories of twelve communities where people are coming together to make their small piece of the world a better place to live.

Via Scotland’s Wellcome Library Names of the witches (in Scotland) c. 1658 Read more about it here; and see a transcript of names here.

Why Milton still matters Paradise Lost can still speak to readers on its 350th anniversary

Via The Verge: The 265 members of Congress who sold you out to ISPs, and how much it cost to buy them (Hint: they’re cheap). “Republicans in Congress just voted to reverse a landmark FCC privacy rule that opens the door for ISPs to sell customer data. Lawmakers provided no credible reason for this being in the interest of Americans, except for vague platitudes about “consumer choice” and “free markets,” as if consumers at the mercy of their local internet monopoly are craving to have their web history quietly sold to marketers and any other third party willing to pay.

The only people who seem to want this are the people who are going to make lots of money from it. (Hint: they work for companies like Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T.) Incidentally, these people and their companies routinely give lots of money to members of Congress.”

How Uber Deceives the Authorities WorldwideThere’s even more to the Uber sleaziness.

Via Southern Living: Angel Biscuits This is an interesting recipe, half biscuit, half roll, and it uses yeast, buttermilk, and baking powder for leavening.

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Elsewhere for March 5, 2017

You should read this for 3/5/2017: Big data and politics means money, death served cold, read more, think more, do more, digital monks, she reads way more than he does,  and scones.

Robert Mercer: the big data billionaire waging war on mainstream media “With links to Donald Trump, Steve Bannon and Nigel Farage, the rightwing US computer scientist [Robert Mercer] is at the heart of a multimillion-dollar propaganda network.”

Slain SEAL’s dad wants answers: ‘Don’t hide behind my son’s death’. Not surprisingly, he’s being mostly ignored by the man who casually decided to send men to their deaths, over dinner, with inadequate advice, for a mission of very little value or point.

Ken Norton of Google Ventures on How I Read More Books. Norton notes that “I read 61 books last year and it was easier than I thought.” Norton offers specific suggestions, and a link to another really interesting piece on Warren Buffett’s reading habits.

The Monk Who Saves Manuscripts From ISIS Father Columba Stewart of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

Notice the headline she’s noticing.

You guys, my friend is on the same plane as Hillary Clinton. Zoom in on the title of the article she’s looking at. pic.twitter.com/356oE9uT0s

— J👏🏻O👏🏻H👏🏻N (@thelastwalt) March 3, 2017

And in case you»re wondering, the paperback book Ms. Clinton is reading is Murder on St. Nicholas Avenue by Victoria Thompson.

Cream scones easy, and delicious. And it’s that kind of weather.

💩🔥💰Trumpery💩🔥💰

Obama Administration Rushed to Preserve Intelligence of Russian Election HackingSaving data before it’s deliberately lost.

Elsewhere for March 12, 2017

You should read this for 3/12/2017:

Zell Liew on How to choose and pair typefaces

Outsmarted: On the liberal cult of the cognitive elite or “What does it mean to be ‘smart,’ and why does it matter to us so much?”

Via Medium: Chris Coyier I was strongly reminded about the scariness of non-secure websites the other day.

Poachers just killed a beloved white rhino — inside a French zoo “Wildlife crime is run by organized crime syndicates with very complex networks of middlemen moving rhino horns from Africa and India to networks in Southeast Asia. With the poaching crisis at such an alarming rate, it was sadly only a matter of time before these animals in zoos and other protected areas were targeted.”

Ex-Hillary Clinton Campaign Manager: What I Wish I Knew About Russian Hacks

If You See Something, Save Something – 6 Ways to Save Pages In the Wayback Machine | Internet Archive Blogs

Extra-Bittersweet Chocolate Pots de Crème

💩🔥💰Trumpery💩🔥💰

Obama Administration Rushed to Preserve Intelligence of Russian Election Hacking

Trump, Offering No Evidence, Says Obama Tapped His Phones“Democrats sharply criticized [💩🔥💰’s] calls on lawmakers Sunday to investigate his baseless claim that former President Barack Obama tapped his phone.” Meanwhile, Comey Asks Justice Dept. to Reject Trump’s Wiretapping Claim and ‘DESTRUCTIVE, BASELESS, RECKLESS:’ WASHINGTON RESPONDS TO TRUMP WIRETAPPING CLAIMS in which “President Obama’s former director of national intelligence denied there ever was a federal court order authorizing wiretapping of Donald Trump properties on a day when the chair of the House intelligence committee said it would heed the president’s call for a Congressional probe of his unsubstantiated surveillance claims.” US Supreme Court held in 1972 that POTUS cannot unilaterally order domestic wiretaps.