Supreme Court Declares Same-Sex Marriage Legal In All 50 States

 

The Opinion is here.

Credit: @bustle https://twitter.com/bustle/status/614540117248770048

Credit: @bustle https://twitter.com/bustle/status/614540117248770048

In a 5-to-4 vote the Supreme Court decided, as Justice Kennedy put it:

These considerations lead to the conclusion that the right to marry is a fundamental right inherent in the liberty of the person, and under the Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment couples of the same-sex may not be deprived of that right and that liberty. The Court now holds that same-sex couples may exercise the fundamental right to marry. No longer may this liberty be denied to them. Baker v. Nelson must be and now is overruled, and the State laws challenged by Petitioners in these cases are now held invalid to the extent they exclude same-sex couples from civil marriage on the same terms and conditions as opposite sex couples (23–24 OBERGEFELL ET AL. v. HODGES, DIRECTOR, OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, ET AL).

And finally:

No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it , respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right (p. 28 OBERGEFELL ET AL. v. HODGES, DIRECTOR, OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, ET AL).

In other words, there is no more same-sex marriage; there’s just marriage.

Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights—Eric Marcus

Eric Marcus.
Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights.
HarperPerrenial, 2002.
ISBN: 978-0060933913.

marcus_making_gay_history

Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights is a collection of interviews, beginning with the formation of the Mattachine Society and The Daughter’s of Bilitis, right through the era of Mcarthyism (when it was worse to be queer than communist), the sixties and Stonewall, the seventies and marches, with the people who were the princ

iples in these historic events. The interviews are framed by editorial commentary to place the interviews in context. Interview subjects include a num

ber of well-known figures like Randy Shilts, Elizabeth Birch, Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Ellen DeGeneres, Randy Shilts, and others who were movers and shakers in terms of GLBT civil rights.

One of the greatest virtues of Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights is that because it’s based on interviews, it’s a collection of primary sources by real people using their own words. It’s confusing at times to identify the various people, but Marcus’ editorial notes help. It’s particularly fascinating to read the words of people who have been involved in gay rights for fifty or more years in terms of how things have changed, and how they’ve remained the same. It’s an interesting collection, covering events that many people may not even know about, but should.

In terms of organization and content, Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights is based on an enormous number of interviews that Marcus, who has an M.A. degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, conducted. These interviews, editorial introductions and summaries begin with the creation of the Mattachine Society and The Daughter’s of Bilitis, and progress historically through Mcarthyism (when being queer than was the only thing that was worse than being a communist), the Stonewall era and the public birth of Gay Pride, the seventies and the start of protest marches. Marcus conducted interviews with people involved, pro and con, with the actual events, as well as using newspapers and underground newsletters and private collections of photos and letters.

I think one of the strongest virtues of this book is that since it’s a collection of primary source documents in the form of interviews of people who were there. These are real people speaking in their own voices. It is fascinating and moving to read the words of people who have been fighting the good fight for QUILTBAG rights for fifty or more years.

Eric Marcus is also the author of Breaking the Surface, the best-selling autobiography of Olympic diving champion Greg Louganis, as well as Is It a Choice? Answers to 300 of the Most Frequently Asked Questions About Gay & Lesbian People. Eric Marcus has a Web site.

What women want: Gay male romance novels

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/valentines-day/what-women-want-gay-male-r…

This quote pretty much says it all. According to m/m author Heidi Cullinan:

“One of the reasons why more women are ravenous for these books is that they want to read something about gay men that doesn’t involve them suffering from [HIV/AIDS], committing suicide or getting bullied. I know I was,” Cullinan says, adding that mainstream TV shows such as Queer As Folk and True Blood have helped heterosexuals embrace guy-on-guy fantasies as “normal.”